/, In the Biz: Wireless News/VINTAGE TECH COULD BE WORTH BAZILLIONS*

VINTAGE TECH COULD BE WORTH BAZILLIONS*

By |2015-07-06T16:35:58+00:00June 16th, 2015|General, In the Biz: Wireless News|

*probably not


The next time you’re cleaning out the basement, you might want to think twice before tossing any pre-2000s tech or related materials. As some have learned the hard way (see San Francisco Apple 1 computer recycler who later learned the computer was worth $200K), it may actually be worth something.

One man found a magazine collection stored under his floorboards that fetched $10K from Intel, who had a bounty on the 1965 edition for containing what’s known as Moore’s Law (turns out it was the only remaining copy). It caught nationwide attention too; he was featured on the cover of BBC News, above an article about Tony Blair (Britain, old prime minister, just in case).

One man found a magazine collection stored under his floorboards that fetched $10K from Intel, who had a bounty on the 1965 edition for containing what’s known as Moore’s Law (turns out it was the only remaining copy). It caught nationwide attention too; he was featured on the cover of BBC News, above an article about Tony Blair (Britain, old prime minister, just in case).

Steve Emery spent $15 on a paperweight 15 years ago that recently fetched $4,000. Turns out the little 2” x 3” box contained examples of early computer chips used in the guidance computer for the Apollo moon missions. Apple 1

Throw it away, don’t throw it away. Up to you. Just saying.

If you’re hoarding electronics, there’s a semi-decent chance that you’ve got some money sitting there. Collectors, tech companies, and many others are looking for anything form old PCI cards, IC pins, printers, original computers and game consoles, and circuit boards.

Now, let’s not confuse pure luck with investment foresight, but vintage computer equipment collecting is a real thing, and depending on its contribution to modern computing and position in the production run, it could be worth valuing.

Tips to consider before hitting E-Bay with your MITS Altair 8800:
– Computer chips and machines from the early 70s. Anything later than that and you’ve just got a recycling problem.
– Serial numbers from early in the production run.
– Packaging and condition. Software without the manual and packaging has almost no value.

Passion Pays Off

Should you be holding onto any of today’s technology? Nope, according to most experts. Put simply, today’s gadgets are mass produced on too large of a scale. But there may be a few exceptions. The key is to get the first of the first of the first (i.e. the first serial number of the first model of the first make of an item). Then keep the original packaging, and seal it in the original box to boost its long-term value.

What about that little old woman with the Apple 1? The recycling depot is offering her a $100,000 check if she turns up to claim it (although it’s worth 10x that). Only 200-ish Apple 1’s were made in Steve Jobs’ garage in 1976.

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